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Hand surgery

At our clinic, we successfully and with a high level of expertise treat the most common hand disorders, such as Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (SCC), Dupuytren’s Contracture and Trigger Finger.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a condition caused by compression of the median nerve in the wrist in a narrow space called the carpal tunnel. This causes pain, numbness, weakness and burning in the arm. Common causes include repetitive wrist movements, genetic predisposition, injury or inflammation. Treatment includes activity modification, splinting, physiotherapy, anti-inflammatory drugs and often surgery to relieve pressure on the nerve. Early recognition and appropriate treatment are key to improving a person’s quality of life.

The diagnosis is made on the basis of a clinical examination and EMG measurements of the median nerve. This measurement is also a prerequisite for surgery.

The surgery is performed under local anaesthesia and takes about 10 minutes. Through a short incision in the palm of the hand, the carpal ligament is visualized, severed and the median nerve is relieved. The success rate of surgery is very high, provided it is performed at an early stage of the disease, when the nerve is not yet permanently damaged by pressure.

After the procedure, you are advised to start stretching your arm immediately, and you will receive written instructions for this. The stitches are removed after 14 days. Recovery time for light manual work is about 1 month, for heavy manual work it can be up to 3 months.

Dupuytren’s Contracture

Dupuytren’s contracture is a condition in which the tissue under the skin of the hand gradually thickens and shrinks, leading to restricted movement of the fingers. It most commonly affects the fourth and fifth finger and can manifest as nodules or subcutaneous connective tissue bands in the palm. This condition is often linked to genetic factors and occurs mainly in older people. In severe cases, it may require surgery to repair the contracture and restore finger mobility.

The operation is performed under local anaesthesia and takes between 15 minutes and 1 hour, depending on the extent of the disease (number of fingers and joints involved). Make incisions in the skin over the nodes and strips to view and remove them.

The stitches are removed after 14 days. Gradual stretching starts a few days after the procedure. Recovery time for light manual work is about 1 month, for heavy manual work it can be up to 3 months.

Trigger Finger

Trigger finger is a condition in which one or more fingers get stuck or completely stuck in a flexed position and are difficult or painful to extend. This is caused by inflammation of the tendon inside the sheath that allows the finger to move. Common symptoms include stubbing, pain and possible swelling in the affected finger. Treatment can include rest, physiotherapy, splinting and sometimes corticosteroid injections to reduce inflammation. In persistent cases, surgery is performed to correct the problem.

In the course of treatment, we initially try to calm the inflammation and the resulting stubbing of the toe with steroid injections. If this is not successful, we will opt for surgery.

The operation is performed under local anaesthesia and takes about 10 minutes. This breaks the tendon clamp around the tendon causing the tightness.

The stitches are removed after 14 days. Gradual exercise is advised the day after the procedure. Recovery takes 3 weeks for lighter physical work and up to 2 months for heavier work.